Tag Archives: Steve Jobs

Yeezus Talks: Kanye West’s W Magazine Interview

For his second print of 2013 the rapper candidly tackles his collaborative work with Jay-Z in the new interview with W Magazine , as well as a bevy of other juicy bites including his own sex tape, his likeness to Hermes, and the city in which he finds the most inspiration. All of the below ideas float around in the context of Yeezus, yet, lest we forget, Kanye is an endless source of inspiration both on and off the mic. Enjoy select excerpts from the interview below, while the full piece can be read on W Magazine‘s website.

On his decision to record in Paris:
“In Paris, you’re as far as possible from the land of pleasant smiles,” West says. “You can just trip on inspiration—there are so many people here who dedicate their lives to excellence.”

The song “I Am A God”:
West was informed that he’d be invited to a widely anticipated runway show only on the condition that he agree not to attend any other shows. “So the next day I went to the studio with Daft Punk, and I wrote ‘I Am a God,’?” West says. “Cause it’s like, Yo! Nobody can tell me where I can and can’t go. Man, I’m the No. 1 living and breathing rock star. I am Axl Rose; I am Jim Morrison; I am Jimi Hendrix.” West is not smiling as he says this, and his voice is getting louder with each sentence. “You can’t say that you love music and then say that Kanye West can’t come to your show! To even think they could tell me where I could and couldn’t go is just ludicrous. It’s blasphemous—to rock ’n’ roll, and to music.”

On why he chose the title “I Am A God”:
“I made that song because I am a god,” he says finally. He laughs for a second, then stops. “I don’t think there’s much more explanation. I’m not going to sit here and defend shit. That shit is rock ’n’ roll, man. That shit is rap music. I am a god. Now what?”

On narcissism:
“On one end, I try to scale it back,” he says. “Because I don’t want to close any of the doors needed to create the best product possible. But my ego is my drug. My drug is, ‘I’m better than all you other mother***ers. Kiss my a**!’?”

On having almost released his own sex tape after it was on sale last fall:
“For the most part, I’d rather people have one of those home videos than some of the paparazzi photos that get published,” he says. “At least I recorded the shit myself. That tape couldn’t have hurt me in any way if it came out—it could only have helped.” He finally decided against releasing it, but don’t be surprised if he changes his mind. “Now, I just do exactly what I want, whenever I want, how the fuck I want,” West says. “ ‘Fuck you’ is my message.”

On wealth:
“I’m not a billionaire; I’m just a millionaire. But I’m the youngest guy I know who has this much interest in design and the ability to actually get some of it. So that makes me an important cog in the wheel.”

On design:
“Furniture is my superobsession now. Furniture and pornography, still. The porn thing has never left since I was in high school.”

On Watch the Throne:
“It was like Steve Jobs and Bill Gates talking at the same time. You know which one of us was Steve.”

On doing everything:
“You know how they say, ‘Jack of all trades, master of none’? I want to be master of all. And not even to be a jack but a king. In fact, not even a king. An ace.”

On Yeezus:
“This music is made to spark the visionaries to stand up for themselves and help the world. Because the world is fucked.”

On Christianity and Ralph Lauren:
“I’m Christian in the same way that people have issues with certain elements of Christianity. It’s like if you go into a Ralph Lauren store, maybe that buyer didn’t do the exact buy that you want, but you still really like that brand.”

On celebrities:
“Anyone who meets me for the first time and is not slightly nervous is completely full of shit. Because when I meet people I respect, I’m nervous. When I go have lunch with Tarantino at the Chateau Marmont, I’m nervous. It’s fucking Tarantino!”

On his intellect:
“Visiting my mind is like visiting the Hermès factory. Shit is real. You’re not going to find a chink. It’s 100,000 percent Jimi Hendrix.”

On his imagination:
“I live a pretty interesting life. But the life that I’m living is way less interesting than what I’m thinking.”

On the tattoo on his forearm of Madonna and Baby Jesus:
“This is me and my mommy.”

On how seriously to take him:
“You should only believe about 90 percent of what I say. As a matter of fact, don’t even believe anything that I’m saying at all. I could be completely fucking with you, and the world, the entire time.”

On his style taboos:
“Even the greatest tattoo artists in the world have a few bad tattoos. And that’s Kanye West. A few of my past outfits—questionable, you know? But I’m testing. I’m discovering who I am.”

On W’s 2010 cover of a nude Kim Kardashian:
“I loved the fact that it happened, that it disturbed people. I loved the fact that it put those curves right inside that Hamptons house, that there’s some Hamptons husbands who had to cover that up.”

On his rock-star status:
“Instead of using it to date as many supermodels as possible or to be as much of an asshole at a restaurant as possible, I would rather use it to access great minds. To be able to go to Axel Vervoordt’s castle on the first day that I meet him.”

Apple CEO Tim Cook on Collaboration

Apple CEO Tim Cook explains how to hire people who will focus on collaboration and deliver the “magic” that happens when great minds come together. Cook spoke as part of his class reunion at Duke University’s Fuqua School of Business.(www.fuqua.duke.edu)

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APPLE CEO AND FUQUA ALUM TIM COOK TALKS LEADERSHIP AT DUKE

Tim Cook spoke to students and alums when he returned for his 25th reunion

“Explore everything. Push the corners of your mind. Just get on this kind of continual learning roller coaster and see what happens.”

This was among the advice Apple CEO Tim Cook shared with students at Duke University’s Fuqua School of Business on April 26th. Back on campus for his 25-year reunion, Cook took part in an hour-long dialogue with Fuqua Dean Bill Boulding and the students in a jam-packed Geneen Auditorium buzzing with excitement to hear from the leader of the world’s most profitable company.

The Apple CEO has embarked on a career far different than he had envisioned after graduating from Fuqua’s Evening Executive MBA program in 1988. “For me the journey was not predictable at all. You have to find your own north star and stay with your north star.”

As 450 Daytime MBA students prepared to graduate, Cook advised the students to heed Abraham Lincoln’s words of wisdom: “I will prepare and someday my chance will come.”

Cook shared the three keys to his leadership at Apple: people, strategy, and execution. “If you get those three right the world is a great place.”

Students were able to get a unique glimpse into Cook’s motivation, inspiration and leadership role models. Raised in the south and a witness to racial injustice, Cook described his admiration for Robert Kennedy and Martin Luther King Junior’s bravery in risking their lives to fight for what they believed in. He has just three photos in his office: two of Kennedy and one of King.

Cook was asked when to follow strict principles of business theory and when to break the rules. His response stressed the importance of risks and learning from failure. “You should rarely follow the rules. What Fuqua teaches you so well is how to learn and how to collaborate. Write your own rules.”

This message resonated with first-year MBA student Shelby Hall. “I know this follows Steve Jobs’ belief that Apple creates products which consumers didn’t ever know existed,” she said. “It was interesting to hear Tim Cook’s perspective on how we should balance writing our own rules while applying the foundations of business taught here at Fuqua.”

Cook also spoke about some of his recollections from Fuqua. “The people made it an incredible experience. It was great for me to see how bright people approached solutions in different ways.”

First-year MBA student Juan Danzilo says Cook’s willingness to share his experiences shows a deep commitment to Fuqua. “Tim Cook’s presence reflects Fuqua’s sense of community. His humility and eloquence is admirable. It certainly was a unique opportunity for MBA students to hear from such an inspirational leader.”